Wire for pins

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  • #49020
    darius2412
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    Hello,

    In a couple of movements i have been overhauling, mainly Enfield and Smith Enfield, in some places instead of using steel pins they have used a wire that is bent left and right (sort of into an S shape after going through the arbor) when removed some tend to break and need replacing with new.

    Can anybody tell me is there a special type of wire that should be used, I can’t seem to find any reference to this item in any clock spare supply shops.

    Many Thanks

    #57454
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
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    If I am thinking correctly of what your trying to replace… I found couple of different sized small diameter brass round stock that has been just the right size at a hardware store, it is a bit softer and easier to bend into that s shape without breaking, sometimes the older clocks have a square shaped piece, still the trick is to be able to bend it without it breaking. I usually just replace them all when taking a movement apart as they tend to sometimes look o.k. but with a bit of pressure they come right apart because they are cracked already. Do you guys have hardware stores over there? :D William

    #57455
    arutha
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 85
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    Hi Darius,
    on the Smiths and Enfield clocks if you see those “s” shaped pins holding the levers in place they are original, it means the clocks have never been apart before, you can do as William suggests and use brass wire as they are not under a lot of strain but I just use standard tapered steel clock pins.
    Paul.

    #57456
    bernie weishapl
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    • Topics Started: 58
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    I use brass wire I got from the hardware store. It works just fine.

    #57457
    darius2412
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 2
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    thanks for the replies

    i was wondering about using brass instead as it is easier for bending.

    “Do you guys have hardware stores over there?”
    a few left william” :) but only the big guys and they normally don’t stock wire of this gauge best bet here other that online is to get it from a model hobby shop.

    “they are not under a lot of strain”

    Thanks Paul, there is one that is under strain, it’s located near the back plate and presses down a silver star-shaped spring type steel that holds the wheel onto the minute arbor and acts like a slip clutch enabling the turning of the minute arbor for adjusting without have the wheel Turning, and it’s quite a pain to press it down and get a pin through, am sure there must have been a tool for this in those days. so will use a steel pin as you have mentioned for this one, if i can press it down enough :|

    Cheers

    Darius

    #57458
    daryn
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 2
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    If you can find paper clips the right size the wire they’re made from is ok , or as Paul suggests use a standard taper pin , just be sure there’s still endshake on the levers . . .
    Daryn

    #57459
    arutha
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 85
    • Total Posts: 1536

    Hi Darius,
    when I said not under a lot of strain I meant from front to back, the lever you refer to is for the hammer strike, the force is from the side of the arbor so using brass/paper clip/tapered pin won’t be an issue. As Daryn rightly points out, whatever you use must allow the lever free movement, one of the most common problems with these is when pinning the lever back with a taper pin, the fat end of the taper pin can rub against the plate so not allowing enough freedom.
    Pressing the Spring down on the centre arbor hard enough to get the pin in is not that difficult, put the arbor on a hard surface, small washer on first(this is usualy stuck to the pinion when you take the wheel off and a lot of people put the clock back together before they realise they have 1 small washer left over and have no idea where it came from), then the wheel, then the pronged sprung washer and apply even pressure with thumb and finger, enough to make the hole visible. Cut the tapered pin once it is in so it sits inside the depression on the sprung washer.
    Paul.

    #57460
    kalaleq
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 0
    • Total Posts: 1

    I have worked on a number of Enfield’s and generally just use black mechanics wire as that seems to be very similar to what was there in the first place, and so far have not had any problems. As far as the rear of the minute arbor, same thing. I just squeeze it gently with a pair of soft jaw pliers, slide the wire into place, cut to length and bend the ends. Hopefully this helps.

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darius2412Wire for pins