Watch-Craft Mainspring Winders

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  • #48916
    michael weaver
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    • Topics Started: 8
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    Has anyone ever replaced the catch on a wristwatch mainspring winder? A few of mine have a pretty small amount of catch left on them and I would like to replace it. It’s not a straight hole all the way through so it would have to be reamed out and replaced. They are very very small and I am not sure how to go about attempting it. I have thought about just drilling a new hole all the way through and installing a new piece. That way I could always drive it out in the future and replace it easier. Any thoughts???

    #56282
    vanhooglesnort
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    • Topics Started: 10
    • Total Posts: 28

    I’ve been contemplating the same fix for my own set. I was leaning toward making a new arbor for each size (or perhaps a universal one) so that my catch/pin/tang/whatever could be easily replaceable. If I come up with a good design I’ll post details, but I’m curious about what others may have already done.

    #56283
    chris mabbott
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    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    Michael, I changed the ones on mine, can’t remember if it’s a watchcraft or marshall, but you should be able to punch the old one out and make a new one.
    Does yours have the stepped shaft with two pins to accommodate large and small MS?

    If not, Vans idea is good

    #56284
    arutha
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    • Topics Started: 85
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    I cant see why you couldn’t do it the same way you would replace a hook on a clock barrel arbor or barrel wall. Now I appreciate these watch mainspring winders are small but you should still be able to drill out the arbor where the old hook was, tap a hole and insert a screw using a bit of loctite. You can then using needle files shape the head of the screw. Obviously for the very small winders for ladies wristwatches it is a delicate operation but worthwhile if you look at the price of a new set and buying another set used you could just end up with the same problem. I will do one of mine tomorrow and report back. :)
    Paul.

    #56285
    ewinrow
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    • Topics Started: 26
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    Arutha, could you post a pic or two so we all can get a better understanding of what the cure is? :? I’d like to see because I have worked many ladies wrist watches and anything that can make it easier would be a great help. Thank you, looking forward.

    #56286
    arutha
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    • Topics Started: 85
    • Total Posts: 1536

    I will post pics Ed as long as it works out ok, no point in posting pics of a lump of mashed up winder :)
    Paul.

    #56287
    michael weaver
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    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 65

    Sorry it took me so long to get back. My job is acting like they want me to work or something, the nerve of these people. 🙄 Anyways I’m looking forward to seeing what you come up with. I still think drilling a hole straight through and inserting a small pin that I could easily drive out from the other side in the future is the best route. To try and remove the pin that’s already in it doesn’t seem like a feasible job. They ran them in at a 45 degree angle then curled one end up as a catch. That being said, there is such a small amount left that it would have to be reamed out. If there was enough of the catch left to just drive out I wouldn’t worry about replacing it in the first place. Also, this is the small womens bracelet winders meaning that the catch is microscopic. Can’t wait to see the pics of your non-mashed winders.

    P.S. A great tip for the day. A staking set can be used to repair expensive glasses that your kids decide to lay on the bathroom floor and step on.

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michael weaverWatch-Craft Mainspring Winders