Timing Machines

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  • #57074
    ewinrow
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 26
    • Total Posts: 185

    Hey Chris; here’s an 💡 , I use a mechanics stethoscope, works for me, cheep and I feel like a real clock doc. :D Regretfully, the rubber tubes ruptured and I am currently looking for another one again at yard sales and flea markets. Has this method been used by any other clock doc on here? :mrgreen: Heck, I figured if I can listen to my BMW run like a clock, then why can’t I listen to a clock run like my BMW :?: 8-)

    #57075
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1553

    Hi Tom,
    David most likely won’t be checking in until tonight so here’s the link to MicroSet. There’s a typo in Davids post. It’s “Bryan Mumford” not “Bumford” :D . He’s a good guy.

    Bob

    #57076
    ewinrow
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 26
    • Total Posts: 185

    Bob; is this an unused procedure, a not mentioned procedure, or is this another sales procedure for what big pockets can afford? Be mindful now, this is not a challenge, just a question :?: I’m just curious because it has worked for me. Taught to me by my grandfather. Only on vehicles, motors and machinery with my applications, recently used on clocks by me, he was a registered/certified mechanical genius/inventor and not a watchmaker per say and correct me please, the overall concept is to listen for timing (beat). Key word being” listen”. I never challenged my Grandfather nor do I challenge you or your wisdom. I’m just a humble learning poor clock repairman, I don’t have the funds to keep-up with the high-tech gentleman/woman to make certain purchases as many may be here on the form. Sometimes I have to improvise and think as any low income personal would have to with common sense would. Bottom line, what works for you and satisfies you and your customer with no call backs for the same problem, is it not the right and exceptional concept/way? :)
    Do we have to sometimes, think outside of the box?

    #57077
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1553

    Hi Ed,
    Are you asking about the Stethoscope, the MicroSet or possibly both?
    If the stethoscope it will definitely help with hearing a clocks tick. Clocksmiths took them on house calls all the time. The little amps that are available on the market became popular a while back but some guys still haul a stethoscope around with them. As for the Microset I love them. Bernie said it well in his above post. Not sure if you were asking about the Microset or possible the optical sensor that Tom, Chris and David were discussing for timing watches.

    Bob

    #57078
    steve fornelius
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 3
    • Total Posts: 11

    Being hard of hearing, I need something that amplifies the sound and/or gives me other options I’d like. I looked at the products available and settled on the Mumford MicroSet. I had a phone amplifier and pickup that gave me the sound I needed to set beat and hear things rubbing, but the advantages of the machine is its ability to let you set the rate accurately, set the beat very accurately, and if you don’t know how fast the clock is supposed to run, to measure the beats per hour of the clock using a magnet on the minute hand and a sensor mounted to the stand. Once you have that number (which is established by the gear train) you can set the rate quickly. I use mine several times everyday.

    I also got an ultrasonic stethoscope which was designed to listen to mechanical sounds. It worked, but I didn’t need to get to that level.

    #57079
    david pierce
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 90
    • Total Posts: 1360

    Tom, Bob,
    The link is on this blog under Bernie’s comment. It was http://WWW.bumford so I thought that was how he spelled his last name; shows how much I know???????
    david

    #57080
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1553

    David and Tom,
    Sorry guys. Looks like I forgot the link in my post. Bernie had it correct. It’s http://www.bmumford.com/ and the following link will take you to the accessories page which has the sensors. If you scroll down you’ll also find a ‘hairspring sensor’ for those who may have an urge to vibrate hairsprings. http://www.bmumford.com/mset/access/access.html
    David, I see what you mean. At first glance it does look like bumford! :)
    Enjoy
    Bob

    #57081
    tmac1956
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 171
    • Total Posts: 1259

    Guys.

    That’s OK… my students often spell my last name as mccallASSter. Perhaps they are trying to tell me something.

    Later,
    Tom

    P.s. They also call me MacDaddy but I don’t know what that means. 😳

    #57082
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1553

    Hey Ed,
    I just read your post again and it looks like I didn’t answer your main question. Sorry about that. I was in a time crunch and I did a quick hit and run up here last night. I think what you’re asking is do you really need an expensive set up like this? Can a guy that’s pressed for bucks get by with some creative ingenuity? Absolutely Ed!

    When you look back a century or so none of those great watch and clock makers had all the goodies we have access to now but they sure did great work! You don’t need most of the modern tools and stuff you see for sale at the supply houses but…many of these tools can make life much easier and work hours more productive.
    The timing machine is a great example of this. Without a timing machine one has to record a timepieces rate over a long period of time where a timing machine will give a good indication of a timepieces rate in an instant. Using it to set the beat is just a tiny portion of what it’s capable of doing. It’s also an extremely powerful diagnostic tool. Still, all of the wonderful things that it will do can also be done without the use of the machine. It’s just a big time saver in the long run.

    Your stethoscope idea is an excellent one. It will work wonders when setting the beat on some of those quiet tickers.
    What Tom was talking about though was timing a watch. To count the ticks of a watch he would need to have some type of sensor to see or ‘pick up’ the ticks. Rather than an audio type sensor he came up with the idea of using a strobe light. A very interesting idea. By using an accurate and adjustable strobe he could determine the exact rate of the balance by adjusting the strobe frequency until reaching resonance with the balance. Seems link a cool idea. This led to the optical sensor idea that David mentioned. All creative ideas.

    Enjoy,
    Bob

    #57083
    ewinrow
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 26
    • Total Posts: 185

    Hey Bob; Thanks for the reply. Yes I was referring to the stethoscope. Now I have an accurate answer and will read-up on those items you mentioned. I know somewhat of a beat machine, but the rest is currently unknown to me. Will research though ;) I guess until then I’m going to still work with the old dusty alcohol lamp’s and the old stethoscope method. :P Surly though I will look into a beat machine, depending on eBay price’s. ;) It will be a minute or two down the road. Or try to catch Radio Shack before they go out of business. :( Well, gotta go for now, surly will keep-up with things here on the form and the vid’s. Good day and Peace to all, Ed. 8-)

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