Saving Parts

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  • #48342
    watchthebear
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 21
    • Total Posts: 77

    Hi folks, another newbie question. In what manner should one save parts? this would be watches only. Do you save by the specific part? Or would one save by the manufacturer? I have limited ability to save in very sophisticated ways, so was wondering which way would give me the best chance of finding a part that might help me fix a watch. Or, are there other optinos that i am just not thinking about. Thanks for any help……………….b

    #52097
    c.kelly
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 164

    Good Question. Not sure I have the best answer possible. I try several things. First if I have a parts watch I keep it together. That way if I need parts from it they will be protected and likely be in good shape. Another thing I do is save small tins and boxes I get parts in and use those to store parts in that are in the same caliber family. Then I will write the name and caliber on the box. Another thing I try to do is limit myself to a certain kind of watch to buy to work on. That way I’m likely to have parts on hand. Now of course if someone wants me to fix something that is different story. Other people may have different and better thoughts.

    Charles

    #52098
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
    • Total Posts: 1437

    Hi b, Charles, sounds like a good idea. I work on clocks and had just moved a drawer unit into the shop for the same thing. My idea too was to keep the works together and have small bins for any other parts that would be for that particular clockworks. I was thinking that I would keep each drawer for each brand of clockworks, ie. Seth Thomas, Gilbert, Waterbury, ect…,. would be easier to find what I was looking for if I do it that way.. 🙄 hopefully. I would think for watches though you could use those plastic bin units and label the fronts, hang them on the wall???? just a thought ;) have a great day, William

    #52099
    c.kelly
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 164

    Eventually I will evolve into a system similar to what you are talking about with drawers. Will place dividers in shallow drawers segregated for movement calibers. Will still keep parts in containers as they can be hard to see sometimes. Just this past Friday I took the stem out of a watch, placed it in a tin and proceeded to look for it for several minutes even though I knew where it was supposed to be. Right now I seem to be kind of picking broken Omega 1001s to work on because I just like that watch and sometimes I can find one listed as broken that is pretty easy to fix. I helped clean out an old watch makers shop several years ago and he had drawers similar to the old card drawers they used to have in the public library, except that he had one wall of his shop devoted to these drawers. Before you all get too excited about cleaning out his shop another watchmaker had already been there and got all the good stuff.

    Charles K

    #52100
    watchthebear
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 21
    • Total Posts: 77

    Hi folks, your ideas were very helpful, thanks. One further question: does “caliber” mean something like the level of quality? Or, is it the number of jewels, etc? perhaps someone has a link that explains. thanks for all your help………….b

    #52101
    c.kelly
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 164

    Term caliber is like a model number. For instance Omega makes a caliber 1000 and in that caliber family will be a caliber 1001 and a 1002. Think of the old days where Chrysler made Plymouth and Dodge and on some models it appeared as if the only difference was the badges on the hood. There are some differences but for the most part the parts for one will work on another. Then later Omega comes out with a caliber 1010. In this family there are also calibers 1012, 1020, 1022 and others. There are some differences such as a 1012 is a date model and a 1020 is a day-date, if I am remembering right. Again here most parts are interchangeable. Say you go to order a balance for a 1012 it will also fit all the other calibers but a 1012 part generally would not work on a 1000. Generally speaking if a manufactor made a change in the movement they gave it a new caliber #. If you should go to this link http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&136&2uswk&Omega_1000 you will see a picture of an omega 1000 plus the other members of its family. Knowing this makes it easier to find parts. This information is also obtained from other sources such as a bestfit catalogue. Hope I made since with this generalized explaination.
    Charles

    #52102
    watchthebear
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 21
    • Total Posts: 77

    Hi Folks, thanks again Charles. You gave me a lot of valuable new information. I appreciate all who reply to my very basic questions. I don’t have much knowledge of this subject, but i will try to ask better questions each time. thanks all………b

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