Mystery Tool #3

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  • #49533
    sstakoff
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 13
    • Total Posts: 42

    No idea… Something to do with hairspring colleting??




    #62342
    sstakoff
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 13
    • Total Posts: 42

    Pretty certain that this is a hairspring studding table. The spring-loaded jaws would hold the stud securely.
    But I’m not sure of the purpose of the sliding plate with the scale on it. Could that be used to push a tapered
    pin into the stud (or possibly collet)???? If so, I would have expected to be able to move it with a finger-turned
    knurled knob instead of the hex-headed bolt on this unit.

    #62343
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    Tough call Stu, when they are erroneous tools, like finding a body with no I.d lol

    It’s definitely for clamping something and giving a controlled lateral push on something angled… So what is on a watch that would require such a controlled movement??
    The only thing that comes to mind is adjustment of pallet stones, pushing them in??
    Or even a pallet stone comparator which allows you to set new stones in the same position as the old ones..
    Is it possible the Allen bolt is a replacement ? Try cleaning and libricating the threads, see if it can be turned by finger..
    Just a guess-a-vous .

    #62344
    tmac1956
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 171
    • Total Posts: 1259

    Chris:

    What is the angle of the side sliding piece as measured perpendicular to the transverse axis of longer part? Perhaps that will give us a clue….

    Just a thought…

    Tom

    #62345
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    Tom, Maybe Stu can provide that info…

    I’m purely taking a wild stab based on the slight similarity to other pallet jewel tools, and the angle of the lateral piece that seems to match a pallet stone…

    Now whether this is for ALL pallet styles is another question?? I’m wondering if it is for lever style pallets as these would seem to fit better. I don’t have a clear shot of a lever, but I do have one for a standard pallet to show the jewel angle in relation to the “pusher”

    Again, I’m just guessing here as I don’t know the size of this, so my mock up is an exaggeration to show angle. :geek:

    There also seems to be a piece missing as shown by the arrow…

    #62346
    tmac1956
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 171
    • Total Posts: 1259

    Chris:

    That’s what I was thinking – if the angle was +-105 deg. This tools looks like it is used to accurately push the pallet jewel a measured distance into the receptacle. I suppose for different forks you could rotate it around in the holder to get the angles to match up with the pusher.

    Nice tool!
    Tom

    #62347
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    Tom, I was thinking that it “might” be for only lever types because of the straight line groove in the tool.. A lever pallet safety guard pin would neatly fit into this groove when it was turned over.
    The T shaped pallet, by comparison, would not sit flat due to the guard pin resting on the tool body, at 90 degrees to the slot. IF that is, it needed to be turned….

    This is like detective work 😆

    #62348
    sstakoff
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 13
    • Total Posts: 42

    I will try and do some more investigation tonight. Sorry for the lousy photos – will see if
    I can take some clearer shots with dimensions.

    Stu

    #62349
    sstakoff
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 13
    • Total Posts: 42

    Ok… Some progress. Attached are a few more pics. As you can see, the diameter of the tool is ~40mm (note that the scale is not properly aligned at the zero
    mark as I was looking at the monitor).
    The tool is signed R. Von Aesh of Switzerland (I think).
    There is a set screw on the bottom which locks the sliding plate adjuster wheel. The wheel appears to have graduated markings on it for
    fine adjustments. And the most important clue was revealed when I removed the sliding plate. Beneath it were about 3-5 tapered brass pins….




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sstakoffMystery Tool #3