Minimum ultrasonic recommendation

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  • #49459
    charlie188
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    • Topics Started: 3
    • Total Posts: 6

    What would be the minimum ultrasonic tank size to start working on clocks

    #61800
    bernie weishapl
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 58
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    I would go for no less than 2.5 gallon. I have one that is 2.7 gallon and wish I had bigger for the bigger grandfather movements. But be prepared to pay from about $850 to $1000.

    #61801
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
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    I agree with Bernie on size, I have a 2.5 gal and yes at times a little bigger would be nice. I think you can get decent one from 400 to 600. I originally bought a “prosonix” brand. I have used it for 4 years…..almost constantly….I do not have experience with other more expensive models. what I looked for was the power and frequency levels in a comparison. some of those expensive cleaners have alot of features that I think are not necessary. for me a timer, heater, tank capacity, # of transducers and frequency, the rest is eye candy. I bought mine for 360 but I think they are up in the 400s now.

    #61803
    Anonymous
    • Topics Started: 14
    • Total Posts: 129

    It would sure be good to have one of these ultrasonic machines but I’m still gasping for air after checking the prices online 😮
    Will cleaning by hand in a large bucket and soft brush be acceptable for a slow moving, beginner like myself using ZEP?

    Thanks
    Phil

    #61804
    stevefitzwater
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 48
    • Total Posts: 385

    Yeah they are mighty proud of their products, as far as hand cleaning, that is how I clean my clocks, a Tupperware container for the Zep and then two same size containers for the alcohol washes..

    eventually I will pick up that ultrasonic, but for now, I clean them by hand using a soft brush and tooth brush and some peg wood.

    It takes a little longer, and I let mine soak for an hour before even touching them, then using a brush I clean it all, and use the tooth brush on tough areas, and around pivot holes, then I rinse them in warm water thoroughly, hand dry them off a little before into the first alcohol bath for 5 mins, then into the second for another 5 mins. Then into the drying box for 10 mins.

    #61805
    bernie weishapl
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    • Topics Started: 58
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    For a couple of years I cleaned clock movements by hand using dawn dishing washing liquid and murphys oil soap. Today I use Zep orange in my ultrasonic but would be good for hand cleaning I would think. I would let the movement soak for maybe a half hour before I would start with the brush making sure you get all the pinions clean. I had rinsed twice is clean water and then in denatured alcohol to make sure all water was gone. I then put it in a homemade drying unit. I got a commercial dryer later from S. La Rose which I still use today.

    #61802
    Anonymous
    • Topics Started: 14
    • Total Posts: 129

    Thank you Bernie
    That is very helpful information and is appreciated. I’m trying to get started for a little of an investment as possible until I can prove to my spouse that it is a hobby that I will stick with. I have loved old clocks as far back in time as I can rememberso this is something that I would like to do for extra spending money when I retire in a few years.

    All the best to you Bernie,
    Phil

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charlie188Minimum ultrasonic recommendation