Help To Identify Watch Tools

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  • #48833
    mahlon
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    Can some of you watch people help me identify these tools. I purchased them with some clocks at a garage sale, and I am not sure what they are. I have no desire to work on watches ( just too tiny), so I have no clue what they are or what they are worth. I was going to try to trade them to uncle Larry for clock tools (spring winder, hand bushing set or something that I can possibly use). I have also got 65 ww collets (mostly Peerless, starret), a flip over toolrest for Peerless lathe and a Jacobs chuck. I have a Taig lathe and I am not sure I will need the ww stuff. :? Mahlon

    #55518
    tmac1956
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    mahlon:

    If you’ll post a few pics we can probably help you ID them. As to the WW collets, you won’t have any problem selling those I’ll bet.

    Thanks!
    Tom

    #55519
    mahlon
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    Sorry I forgot to add the attachment 😆 Mahlon

    #55520
    tmac1956
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    mahlon:

    Here’s what I see…

    Bow closing pliers
    Movement holders (3 rectangular, one round)
    Two pair of hand/gear pullers
    One spring loaded palett warmer
    Roller remover
    Jewel pusher
    10 prong sleeve wrench
    The two round tools with grooves look like case wrenchers
    I can’t identify those odd looking pliers with the out pointing tips
    I can;t tell what the flat plate gage is for

    Well, that’s about all I can identify…

    THanks!
    Tom

    #55521
    mahlon
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 28
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    thanks Tom, The gage, is a glass gage, anyway that’s what it says. I’ll send the pics. to Larry, and see what I can work out with him. Mahlon

    #55522
    arutha
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 85
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    The thing that looks like a bulky pair of hand cuffs for small people (Truing caliper)can be used as a poising tool and also for checking the flatness of wheels, there should be an adjustable arm on it so when you set a wheel between the jaws (by its pivots) the arm can come down and be locked just above the rim, you can then turn the wheel and see if there is any difference in the gap between the wheel rim and the arm.
    To use as a poising tool you just mount the balance in-between the jaws and gently spin it, when it stops you mark the bottom of the balance and then spin it again, if it keeps stopping in the same place you know you have a heavy spot on the balance.
    Paul.

    #55523
    mahlon
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 28
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    Thanks Paul, I have a friend here that was showing me a watchmakers bench a few weeks ago. It had a lot of this type of tools in it, plus a lot of others . I am going to see if I can talk him out of it. He just buys stuff to be buying. He usually has a piece of antique furniture he needs restored, and will trade. I guess if I get enough watch equipment, I’ll be able to trade for clock tools :) Mahlon

    #55524
    david pierce
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 90
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    Mahlon,
    The funny looking pliers are for watch bows.
    david

    #55525
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
    • Total Posts: 1437

    Hey Mahlon, buying clock or watch tools at a good price, keeping what you need and reselling to cover what you paid for it all is a great way to acquire tools, I have done that several times and have little or no cost in alot of my tooling. One way I learned what something was was searching ebay for watch tools and finding something that looked like what I had, view the description if it was by someone who knew what it was and then research the books I had to see how it was used, took awhile to figure things out but it did help. I would also like to add that there was a time I said “no way” am I going to get into watches, I felt really overwhelmed at the idea, well, some guys here had talked me into giving it a go. Low and behold I found that working on pocket watches was a great change up from clocks, it is a different world and to me, very relaxing, I really enjoy it…. since then and many repairs of my own pocket watches I have added pocket watch repair to my business, I do not take in wrist watches as I know would be over run with them and I am so busy with clocks and pocket watches already. If you have any inkling as to the possibility of working on your favorite type of watch it may be a good idea to save some of the tools and give it a try on something inexpensive and see if you want to go in that direction. If not then at the least you have tried and learned what these tools do and the value of them. Have a fantabulous day, William

    #55526
    mahlon
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 28
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    Thanks William, I had thought about that, but right now, I am getting more and more calls for clock repair and I don’t have near the tools that I need. There were two clock repair people here in town, and both have retired. They are trying sending people to me. They have been go enough to help me with a few of the repairs, and to teach me a few techniques, but eventually they’re going to get tired of me bugging them. They both still work on clocks for themselves, so if they are busy, I have to wait until they have time to help me. I have a guy that is trying to sell me a watch makers bench full of watch tools. I have talked to Uncle Larry, and he is willing to trade for clock tools when he has them. I will probably hang on to all the collets that I have, hoping to find a ww lathe. Mahlon

    #55527
    peggy332014
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 20
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    Looks good to me Mahlon!

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mahlonHelp To Identify Watch Tools