Hair Transplant

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  • #49196
    chris mabbott
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    One of the little irritations I always find on these old watches is that someone has grossly exceeded the limit of the index, thus, forcing the hairspring into one or the other index pins, which wears out the pins and makes it impossible to adjust the timing. As in this example of a very early New York Standard PW.
    I’m not a fan of NYS timepieces but non the less, their early contributions are of significant historical value to make them collectible. This is from an 1887 model, their second year of production.

    Although this is a common repair, I just figured I would take some shots anyway for ref..

    So here is what the problem was.. I say hair transplant because these pins are like small hairs, in the one pic you can see the point of a needle next to the pins for comparison

    #59168
    chris mabbott
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    We’re going to change the left pin, as we look at it.. 😯

    I normally cut off 2/3 of the bad pin and leave a small piece sticking out for the punch to rest on, we have to remove this pin from the bottom up.

    First we make or select from stock, a brass taper pin that is the same diameter (1/4 of the way up the new pin) as the other good pin.

    It should fit through semi loosely as it needs to be pushed through and tightened.. So that when it has been seated, the larger diameter of the new pin should match the remaining one.

    #59169
    chris mabbott
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    Once you’re satisfied with the diameter, set it in your staking set or block and gently AND I MEAN GENTLY MISTER, GET DOWN AND GIVE ME 20 😆 tap in the new pin, I just use the dumb end of my tweezers which is sufficient, until you have matched the diameter of the remaining pin. This is why sizing your pin and estimating how much it can be tapped down is important before hand. It can’t be too tight or too loose.

    #59170
    chris mabbott
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    Here you can see that when the final last taps are given, it will be approximately the same size..

    I always leave this end long until i’ve finished with the top side

    #59171
    chris mabbott
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    On the top side I cut the remaining pin excess and leave about 1mm sticking out the top hole..
    This may not be the official method but it’s my way that works for my hands :)

    So we have 1mm protruding out the top, I rough file a lip on the top of the pin, then using a small flat tipped punch, i tap it in almost flush. We need to make a little rivet on the top.
    Now we can use our round tip punch to finish off the top, just a gentle tap will spread out the material as you can see in the pic..

    #59172
    chris mabbott
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    I then use a super fine polishing stick to remove the excess material so that it is flush with the hole. We don’t want it too deep nor too high, the chamfer of the hole should just be visible for aesthetic purposes also. 8-)

    #59173
    chris mabbott
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    Before I installed the new pin, I buffed the contact area of the remaining pin to remove any burrs or rough spots, always a good practice to buff these anyway..

    And here is our newly formed pin, ready to be closed to the HS and put to work.. :D

    #59174
    willofiam
    Moderator
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    Christopher!!!! excellent documentary ;) . thank you for sharing this, almost makes me want to go replace one of those now :D you do nice work, I always look forward to your posts. William

    #59175
    brianw
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    • Topics Started: 21
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    Very interesting Chris.
    I know nothing about watches, but I always find your posts interesting and am looking forward to your future posts.
    Brian

    #59176
    arutha
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    Beautiful work Chris, another useful and well detailed photo essay.
    Paul.

    #59177
    chris mabbott
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    Thanks guys, I’m glad it may prove useful..

    This is one of those stooped little jobs that takes about an hour or gets completely overlooked and while other bigger better things get covered, the humble yet important index pins get forgotten :(

    #59178
    david pierce
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    • Topics Started: 90
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    Chris,
    You are a real treasure to this forum, Thank you for sharing this with the rest of us.
    david

    #59179
    tmac1956
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    • Topics Started: 171
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    Chris:

    Wow…. Very nice work. I haven’t seen one that bad YET, but now I know where to go for the instructions.

    Thanks!
    Tom

    #59180
    bernie weishapl
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 58
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    Thanks for the post Chris. I have not seen a bad one yet either but it is nice to know they can be repaired. Hopefully as nicely as you did. Great job.

    #59181
    chris mabbott
    Participant
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    @david pierce wrote:

    Chris,
    You are a real treasure to this forum, Thank you for sharing this with the rest of us.
    david

    Aw shucks David… As my Scots buddy would exclaim…. You’re making me blush like a bonnie wee girrlll 😳

    Thanks for your kind words gents..

    This NYS has been ongoing for about 3 yrs 😳 It’s one of those that I just kept putting aside as others took priority.
    Like Jan’ watch, it was one thing after another and I suppose I just got PO’d with it 🙄

    It is a relatively inexpensive item as NYS pieces, after a few years, became a step up from a dollar watch and they churned out millions of them, disposable. But the early ones do show some innovation…

    This NYS is interesting because whereas it does not use the Seitz type friction jewel, which I don’t think had been invented in 1887? it does utilize a rubbed in jewel whose setting is then friction fitted into the balance. Although a bit awkward to adjust, it is possible to attain a certain margin of fine tuning in either direction. Unlike the screw mounted, rubbed-in jewels that had no adjustment..

    Here it is when I got it, and after another cleaning, 3 yrs later 😆

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