Grandfather clocks.

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  • #48915
    ewinrow
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    • Topics Started: 26
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    Hello to all, I’m looking to buy a grandfather clock and wanted to know from the form on what may be one of the cheaper and well known seller names?
    A few names that I have been looking into. Charles sleigh, Tempest Fugit, Edward Meyer, Herschede and Walter Durfee. Out of all which would be the cheapest and hold a decent resale price. I am looking to repair/refurbish and put back on market for sale. My concern is which would yield the most profit?
    I’m looking to spend anywhere between $100.00 up to $1000.00 to make a marginal profit after re-building/re-furbishing. Is it the known date of the item or the manufacturer of the product?
    Out of the names I provided, I would not spend any monies until I spoke with the seller. I’m looking for something running and in tact with a not so high postage price. I’ve just purchased a grandmother clock 5′ high that needs some cleaning and work and a grandfather hanging clock which both look as they have great potential. I have to much invested to even consider this trade a hobby. Slowly turning into a job and with more experiance looking to make profit off what I refurbish/repair.

    #56274
    mahlon
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    • Topics Started: 28
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    Ewinrow, Good question. The problem is there is no right answer. I have found that buying grandfather clocks for resale can be a little risky. To resale them, you first have to find some one that wants or has the floor space for it. Then it has to be the right color, style and size. I am not familiar with some of the name that you listed, but I do know that a lot of them use Hermle movements in them. They have different names on them, and are marked made in Germany, but they are made for them by Hermle. Most of those movements can still be purchased through Butterworth clocks. It is usually cheaper to replace them, then to repair them. I purchased a 7′ tall grandfather clock a year ago, for $100.00, in running condition. It’s a very nice looking clock, with a Klieninger triple chime movement, but I seem to be the only one who likes it. In this purchase, I broke one of our golden rules. Never purchase some thing you would not put in your own home. That way if it does not sale, you can use it. My wife likes the Westminster chime, but hates the early American color. I have found that the younger generation, has very little interest in a clock that does not have digital read out. Most don’t know how to tell time on a numerical dial. :( Most of my clock work comes from people who have inherited grandparents clocks, and can remember them from they’re childhood. Bottom line, if you can buy one cheap enough, and would put it in your own home, I would go for it. If all else fails you have parts for a customers clock :) Mahlon

    #56275
    mahlon
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    • Topics Started: 28
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    Ewinrow, I forgot to mention, I prefer Howard Miller clocks for resale. They seem to hold they’re value a little better than some. I think it is because they are a petty well known clock company. Just keep in mind, I have bought a lot of clocks that only seem to run for the person I purchased it from. Some times the only time that a clock ran, is when the person who bought it at a garage sale, ran to the car with it. I always purchase clocks, planning on reworking them, no mater what the seller says. That way I am never disappointed ;) Mahlon

    #56276
    bernie weishapl
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    • Topics Started: 58
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    I quit buying grandfathers to fix and sell. I had 3 in my shop with $175 as the most paid for one of them. After 1 1/2 yrs I finally sold them for about $450 each. All movements were overhauled and were in excellent condition. Don’t know about your area but around here they just don’t sell. If I were to buy one it would be a Howard Miller. I bought one a couple of months ago for $50 at a auction. Tells ya how they sell around here. I sold it today for $350. It was a small grandmother clock. That will be my last one. Even antique clock sales are down here. Haven’t sold one of those in 6 months and only one last year.

    #56277
    mahlon
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    • Topics Started: 28
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    Hey Bernie, I have a friend here in Okla. that buys clocks on e-bay, restores them and resells them on e-bay. He seems to do pretty good with them. As for me, I am of the same opinion as you. The only clocks that I buy, are ones I want to keep. If some one wants one bad enough I will sell it. Antique clocks are like all of the other antiques I restore, they are only worth what you can get some one to pay :( :( :( Mahlon

    #56278
    ewinrow
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    • Topics Started: 26
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    Thanks Bernie and Mahlon, I kind of have the same feelings. I have many clocks for sale, but no one seems to have any interest in them. I tell my wife their all for sale to keep her mouth in the closed position but I can see she is awfully up-set. As she says, your spending a lot of money in them but you haven’t sold any! My reply, Can’t make anybody buy them if they have no interest. :| Bottom line, I love all of them and just to be in my workroom repairing, refurbishing and most of all listening to them ticking and chiming is very soothing to me.

    Now I also have one other question, I have just picked-up a very nice Hermle wall hanging grandfather clock and someone has removed chains for shipping. I am catching heck trying to rerun them. Is their an easy way to do this and doe’s it have to be pre-wound to keep pendulum moving? I don’t want to tear it down but if I do I’ll clean and check everything while I have the unit in my hands. It’s from the 70’s and looks great inside and out. Am I doing something wrong or is it just a matter of not enough experience with this particular clock? :?

    #56279
    mahlon
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    • Topics Started: 28
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    Ewinrow, the hermle grands that I have worked on my not be the same, but what I do is, tick my wife off by cutting a clothes hanger up and make a 10-12′ piece with a bend in the end of about 1″. In the middle of the el, make a small dip. Start the chain over your sprocket, then slip the wire under the chain to lift it off the sprocket. Then just feed the chain and let it slide down to where you want it. As far as the pendulum goes, It won’t run without the weights installed. Make sure that you have the weight in the right order. :) Mahlon

    #56280
    ewinrow
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    • Topics Started: 26
    • Total Posts: 185

    I do understand Mahlon, I am assuming that the center wheel is the drive wheel? Hence, I put the heavier weight in the center. Maybe Ill try it on the other two wheels to see if the pendulum will continue to swing. One thing though, I will surly take my time before I goof everything up. Clock cost me to much. :)

    #56281
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
    • Total Posts: 1437

    Hey Ed, the heaviest weight will go on the side that runs the 1/4 hour chimes (westminster, canterbury, ect..), the other 2 are usually the same weight, one for the time and the other for the hour count, If they are not the same weight I put the lightest on the time train. William

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ewinrowGrandfather clocks.