Flying Jewels

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  • #48774
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    This might be an obvious trick for a newbie but I was tired of loosing jewels, you know how they shoot off into space even though you moisten the tweezer tips 👿

    Well, one day I was in the local Chinese $ shop and I saw these fluorescent green silicon baking trays, they come in all sizes, they are round, square or rectangular, and they’re kinda sticky to the touch, tacky. I started to use them for movement disassembly, the great thing is, if a small screw, jewel or any part takes a sideways fling, it hits the tray and sticks to it instead of bouncing into a dark void, never to be seen again. They’re great for every job because they’re also floppy so it conforms to your chin if you have to get close and personal and I must admit, that my losses have been reduced to almost nothing, plus, they’re cheap enough to buy a dozen and they clean up good 😆

    I found that I use a round one that’s about 30cm in diameter more than the other shapes, nothing slides around and it’s great for removing jewel settings and working on the balance assembly

    Chris

    #54857
    willofiam
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 75
    • Total Posts: 1437

    Fantastic tip Chris, Ill have to find one and give it a try, My floor may get lonely without me rolling around on it looking for items. William

    #54858
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    I hear you William and I feel your pain, I mean the pain in my knees from being on the floor 😆

    Chris

    #54859
    david pierce
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 90
    • Total Posts: 1360

    The floor area around a workbench is known in the trade as THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE. It still suprises me how far parts can fly no matter how gently you handle them; expecially INCABLOCK and KIF retaining springs.
    david

    #54860
    ewinrow
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 26
    • Total Posts: 185

    Good tip, I to am tired of feeding my carpet and bumping my head under the table upon standing and for the record, I have yet to find anything that took flight.
    I’m going to look for these items also.

    #54861
    chris mabbott
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 119
    • Total Posts: 1525

    Me neither Ed, only months later by accident when I didn’t need it any longer 😆
    I’ve since move from a camo, Bermuda Triangle type floor to a white tiled area, with nothing on it, amazing what you can find.
    I also used my old vacuum cleaner solely for finding parts , I made a filter from a heavy, clear plastic bag, funny but you can hear a roller jewel tinkling up the tube…. GOTCHA :-)

    #54862
    david pierce
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 90
    • Total Posts: 1360

    If you have an air compressor you can buy (Harbor Freight) or even make a compressed air powered vacuum cleaner. The air flow is reversed in a chamber blowing into a small cloth bag. Since it is a small unit the parts are very easy to find.
    david

    #54863
    tmac1956
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 171
    • Total Posts: 1259

    david:

    The Harbor Frieght air compressors are great and cheap too. I’m going to get one of the $50.00 compressors.

    Thanks,
    Tom

    #54864
    arutha
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 85
    • Total Posts: 1536

    Another solution to this problem is to work in a bag, when you come to a bit of work where you know you could have problems you just move the parts inside a clear plastic bag and work in there until you are in a safe position again.
    Paul

    #54865
    hank7421
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 34
    • Total Posts: 103

    Hi Chris
    Like yourself, I am new at this but was getting frustrated with flying screw and small gears. I decided to make myself a portable work station that sits on my desk that would hinder flying objects. I used a display case upside down. I turned the masonite back around so the smooth side would be facing up, slightly trimmed off some of the edges to allow for the material that I wrapped around the back and tapped it back in. I used a material that had a backing to it. This produces a slight cushioning effect and prevents bouncing. I also installed a back screen out of the same material with a well at the bottom so that flying parts will hit the screen and just fall into the well which was stapled to the front. The support arms for the screen were made with a wire hangar that was cut and re-bent and screwed to the front. The cardboard tube was trimmed and acts as the top of the screen. When I have to get close, the top of the cushion touches at the top of my apron. I added cushions on the side for comfort and to support my arms. For those of you who have a more professional work station, something like this could be used on top of it when you have to take apart and put together a watch. It was very simple to put together. It may not be for everyone, but I have not lost a single part since I began using it. Enjoy.
    Hank


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