Chinese Lathes

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  • #48942
    wcloake3
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    • Topics Started: 1
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    I saw a thread from Bernie about Taig lathes and Chris popped in a suggestion about the chinese ones. I am new to all this and I need lots of tools. I need a lathe now and the used stuff us out of sight, I have lost a couple bids. I am looking at the chinese lathes. I can afford one and have a little left over for everything else I gleaned from watching the course.

    Right now I have 30-35 clocks that need repair. most need the movements deep cleaned, I have fixed all the ones that oiling would fix. It seems cleaning I need to turn pivots, etc. I probably will not go the step of making my own gears, my thought is to farm that level work out. Will I get a useful start out of a chinese lathe. I would expect to upgrade later and that is OK. I am an old engineer with lots of too experience and am used to buying pretty good quality tools. I just need a jump start.

    Thanks. I bought the course last Saturday and had watched it all once through by Sunday, I thought I was hooked before…….

    #56606
    bernie weishapl
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    • Topics Started: 58
    • Total Posts: 1218

    I went thru that phase also. If you are going to do primarily clocks I would go with something like the Taig. David P. has the chinese lathe which he said is better for watches and advised me the Taig would be better for clock work. I just got a Taig because I am making arbors for the mainspring wheels on two antique clocks which as you know are larger in size. Today I also pivoted a wheel that was worn badly with the taig and it worked slick. I have a boley lathe which is the same size as one of those chinese lathes and the mainspring arbors can be done but it takes lite cuts and time to do the job. It just doesn’t have the power to make large cuts. I don’t cut gears because I seldom run into that problem and when I do I have a friend who cuts them for me at a reasonable price. I will replace teeth if I have from 1 to 5 teeth max that need replaced.

    I will let David chime in on the chinese lathes and give you his opinion. Congrats on the course.

    #56607
    david pierce
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    • Topics Started: 90
    • Total Posts: 1360

    Wcloake,
    Before jumping in make an assessment of your needs, floor space, available power and most importantly the amount of money you can throw at it. A 3000 pound 5 horsepower toolroom lathe can do a beautiful job machining a clock arbor but a less expensive Taig will also get the job done. I like machinery with a bed made from steel as opposed to aluminum because it is less likely to bend under a load and it is less subject to wear. I prefer induction motors as opposed to universal motors because they are quiet and maintain the same RPM under a cutter load. Think about what you need before taking the financial plunge.
    david

    #56608
    wcloake3
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    • Topics Started: 1
    • Total Posts: 3

    Really solid thoughts from both of you. I have a single large workbench for everything, my garage is even packed. I also prefer steel tools and over my lifetime find cheap tools are not worth the time. I was thinking for now of something to allow me to polish pivots. I am guessing repivoting would also be in my short list, Bernie reminded me of that thought. I am thinking if I can get a boley for now it can be a one shot bench tool to get me by. I have a big old Republic in my factory but I really don’t like using the production tools for my hobby. If need be I will double up on it while we look for a larger house with space for something bigger. I am very luck my wife shares my interest.

    Bob recommended I delve into the forum for new gears, I know that is what I will do for now but this is a very addictive hobby, we’ll see over time.

    Thanks guys.

    #56609
    david pierce
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    • Topics Started: 90
    • Total Posts: 1360

    Wcloake,
    To see a part being made on a Sincere lathe using a graver and tip over tool rest, go to Youtube, type in THE WATCH REPAIR CHANEL and then type in or select HOW TO FIT A NEW CHRONOGRAPH PUSHER. Since the Sincere comes with a cross slide some of the traditional turners who prefer to use gravers have asked if that could be done on a Sincere lathe. In the video Mark Lovick turns a part with a graver to put into a Breitling Chronograph. The tip over tool rest for the Sincere is purchased as an option and comes as a set. The set includes the “D” clamping fixture to hold the tool rest to the bed, a small “T” rest, a large “T” rest, a slitting saw table, and a roller type file guide.
    david

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wcloake3Chinese Lathes