American Mechanical Clocks

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  • #48091
    geppetto
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 2
    • Total Posts: 4

    Greetings all!

    It’s Geppetto again already. As I am following the learning course exactly. I came across where Bob Mentions to start on american clocks first. Well with being a newbie and I’m planning for my first launch to find my first donor 😆 Can anyone shoot me a few names of American clocks that I should start to practice and work on? I really don’t have a clue at this point and I want to make sure to have my eyes peeled when I go to the antique shops and hunting in other non working clock piles. I’m sure this would be of some help to other newbies who are new to clocks.

    Thanks once again!
    Geppetto

    #50785
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1559

    Another good question Geppetto!
    Here’s a quick list of some popular ones.
    E. Ingraham
    Gilbert
    Sessions
    Ansonia
    Seth Thomas
    Waterbury
    E.N. Welsh
    New Haven

    The history of these companies is almost as interesting as the clocks they made (almost).
    I’m sure there are a bunch that I’m forgetting.
    Enjoy,
    Bob

    #50786
    geppetto
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 2
    • Total Posts: 4

    Thanks Bob :D
    Geppetto

    #50787
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    Greetings all. I recently aquired a fine old Waterbury clock. Being completely new to old clocks, I have
    some questions about it. As the pic shows, there’s no weight on the pendulum. Just a hook.
    of course, it would be easy to fabricate one but I don’t have a clue as to the weight of it.
    Anybody guess a ball-park number ?
    Also, the chime spring doesn’t wind. Maybe a pawl missing ? Gonna have to investigate.
    The main question, though is—is there any special technique to deal with the mainspring
    and chime spring when dis assembling ? I’ve managed to make the movement tick for short
    periods but it needs to be cleaned part by part.
    Any info would be appriciated.

    #50788
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    The clock

    #50789
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    I had hoped to get this old carriage clock running for a friend of mine.
    Only issue I see is that the hairspring is not repairable. Vintage 1901.
    Any hope of getting a replacement ?

    #50790
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1559

    Good to see you Clam71!
    I would guess the bob weight would be between 2 to 3 ounces. If you put the word “bob” into TimeSavers search you should get a few in that range to choose from. They may even have one just for Waterbury mantels.

    To disassemble your movement you should capture the mainsprings with a c-retainer (clamp) or wrap some heavy bailing wire around the spring and give the wire a few twists to secure it. I usually use stainless hose clamps. Bailing wire and hose clamps can be found at home depot etc. There’s a section online in video 2 of the clock course that covers using wire and c retainers. You will need some type of mainspring winder to let the springs down for inspection and cleaning after removing them from the movement and to wind them up again for reassembly. I cover a couple of winders and how to use them at the end of the same video if you want to check them out. One is very inexpensive and works well for open spring American clock movements.

    Sorry to say I don’t know of anyone specializing in just hairspring vibrating. There are some people that will vibrate hairsprings when doing complete restorations. You might try http://ptpwp.com as I believe they may do hairspring repair and vibrating without having to do a complete overhaul but I’m not sure. I do know that it’s pretty expensive to have done now. I used to use Guy Colantino but he passed away years ago. He was very reasonable and a true artist as he woked for many years as a hairspring specialist for a large American watch manufacturer. Sadly the great masters have or are disappearing.

    Hope this helps,
    Enjoy Clam!
    Bob

    #50791
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    Thanks always, Bob ! Great ideas….Joe’s carriage clock is gonna never work again.
    But I did my best to fabricate the missing windows.Joe had MS and has been
    bedridden for years now. I need to get it back to him soon but it’s missing screws.
    Sice zero is 3 thousanths too small. Ideas ?

    #50792
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    Stepped in poop !! Looked in my junk drawer and immediately saw what I could use for test
    for the missing bob on the Waterbury. Geeze, it’s keeping perfect time !! Outstanding !!!
    It must be the perfect weight and added length ! Think it’s a keeper.

    #50793
    Bob Tascione
    Moderator
    • Topics Started: 38
    • Total Posts: 1559

    Hi Clam71,
    That’s clever (padlock). I like it!

    As long as the screws that you need for the carriage clock don’t require a snug fit (like timing screws) then I don’t think I would be concerned about the screw being .003 smaller. The important thing would be the thread pitch. If you have another screw that you think is close you can remove one of the screws from the clock that you are trying to match and overlay them to see if the threads match. If they do and you’re only a few thousands different on the major diameter then it should work fine for you.
    Enjoy and keep having fun Clam!
    Bob

    #50794
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    As long as the screws that you need for the carriage clock don’t require a snug fit (like timing screws) then I don’t think I would be concerned about the screw being .003 smaller. The important thing would be the thread pitch. If you have another screw that you think is close you can remove one of the screws from the clock that you are trying to match and overlay them to see if the threads match. If they do and you’re only a few thousands different on the major diameter then it should work fine for you.


    Bob’s reply…

    Yeah but the screws need to be snugged up when fit. Just .003 is a go or not. And they slide in without tools.
    But just barely. Just need to get the right ones or send this back to Joe with something that will hold it together.
    Just gonna be on His mantle after all and He’ll never be able to play with it. MS, ya know….
    I made some windows that were missing out of plexiglass and they’re pretty nice.
    It’s supposed to have a brass door in the back but plexiglass. Oh, well.
    Tried eyeglass repair kits too.. Same size. No-go. Just am gonna get it to Joe, fragile fix, so that it looks nice
    from where I borrowed it from. I learned some — Carriage clocks—- It was new to me.
    Geeze ! Imagine a horse drawn carriage as a means of transportation ! Then the little clock on a shelf.

    Thanks Bob for your help. all of us here on this forum you’ve created owe ya !!
    Happy Holidays to all and God Bless !

    #50795
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    Update on my Waterbury mantle clock:
    It’s been running for 7 days without a wind. The lock I used as a bob needs more weight or to be suspended
    a bit longer. Tried wrapping it with lead/tin solder but that’s a sloppy intolerable fix.
    Just benchwork. It’s an 8 day movement so I think it’s doing SO fine !!
    It “dings” on every hour which sounds exactly like the little bell at thee customer service counter that you smack.
    Half the battle. Gotta get the gong working. Sounds do royal for such a small clock.

    #50796
    clam71
    Participant
    • Topics Started: 8
    • Total Posts: 83

    Sorry to spam but maybe fishing lead split shot ?

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